LINDA PARKER

Published Works

A Seeker After Truths A Seeker After Truths

Geoffrey Studdert Kennedy became one of the most famous army chaplains of the First World War, earning the nickname “Woodbine Willie “, because of his habit of giving out both cigarettes and bibles to the men at the front. During the war also earned the reputation of an unconventional preacher, who kept men spellbound with his passionate oratory. He believed that the place of the army chaplain in battle was near the action, with his troops, and earned a Military Cross for bravery at the battle of Messines. It was during the war that he began writing the prose and poetry that were to make him famous.

However, there was much more to the life of this talented and unusual priest than his war service. In his pre-war parochial ministry he had a definite bias to the poor, working in parishes with a high proportion of slum areas and poverty stricken populations. After the war, with a high reputation amongst ex-service men and becoming a bestselling author , he took on preaching and speaking engagements in all parts of the country, becoming in 1921 a full time speaker for the Industrial Christian Fellowship, whilst continuing to write popular books which came honestly to grips with the post war realities of life in Britain and the difficulties and rewards of the Christian faith in accessible terms.

This book uses previously unused material to examine Studdert Kennedy’s life , in all its aspects, looking at his significance as an army chaplain, priest , theologian , author and public figure and assessing his impact on church life , industry and society before his early death in 1929.

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A Fool For Thy Feast A Fool For Thy Feast

The Revd P.B. Tubby Clayton may lay claim to have been one of the most charismatic and influential Anglican priests of the twentieth century. A Fool for Thy Feast is a modern assessment of the career of this remarkable man, using his personal papers, family papers, Toc H archives and Church Archives.

Tubby was pursuing a conventional clerical career when war changed his course. He became an army chaplain and ran the famous Talbot House in Poperinghe, the‘Haven in Hell' just behind the lines, visited by thousands of the troops fighting in the Ypres Salient. After the war Tubby set up a peace time movement to continue the ethos and values of service and equality which had existed in Talbot House. This movement, which soon spread in Britain and around the world, was called Toc H, the signallers' abbreviation for Talbot House. The movement encouraged young men, and later women, to follow the precepts of ‘the four points of the compass' that is, ‘to love widely, to build bravely, to think fairly, and to witness humbly.'

During this time Tubby was also the incumbent of All Hallows Church, Tower Hill. He built up a powerful reputation with his pastoral work among the parishioners in the city and port of London. During the Second World War Tubby served as a chaplain in oil tankers and also promoted the work of Toc H in the services around the world. His beloved All Hallows was destroyed in the Blitz and Tubby spent much of the rest of his ministry ensuring that it was rebuilt. He retired in 1963 to spend time being involved in Toc H once more.

The life and times of Tubby Clayton encompass the most interesting historical topics of the social, religious, and military histories of the twentieth century

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Shellshocked Prophets Shellshocked Prophets

The Anglican chaplains who served in the Great War were changed by their experience of total war. They returned determined to revitalise the Anglican Church in Britain and to create a society which would be a living memorial to the men who had died. These chaplains will be shown to have had an influence on Prayer Book revision, developments in theological thinking, moves towards church unity as well as having an important part to play in the resolving of industrial tension. Changes in society such as new divorce laws, the acceptance of contraception, and the responsible use of new media were aspects of the inter-war years which former chaplains were to involve themselves in. They were also influential in shaping attitudes to rituals of remembrance in the 1920s and attitudes to pacifism in the 1930s. Given the changes that occurred in the Church of England, in the inter-war years , it is important that the role of former chaplains should be examined and their significance analysed.

This book argues that in the inter-war years the impact of former chaplains was enhanced by their experiences in an unprecedented global conflict, which gave their actions and opinions more moral authority than would otherwise been the case. This question of the impact of former chaplains is considered in the context of debates about the effect that the war had on British society as a whole and on the Church of England In particular.

As the former chaplains were coming to terms with the way in which the Great War had affected their lives and ministries the threat of the next war loomed. In the twenty years after their wartime chaplaincies, former chaplains had gone some way to fulfilling the hopes and aspirations articulated on their return from the front and could claim to have contributed greatly to both developments in the Anglican Church and in wider society.

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Ice, Steel and Fire Ice, Steel and Fire

The generation that reached maturity in the interwar years had grown up in the shadow of the heroic age of Polar exploration and the sacrifices of a generation in the Great War. Their own adventures were to prove as astonishing and heroic as those of a previous generation.

The members of the British Arctic air route expedition to Greenland were to pioneer the weather research methods necessary for Trans-Atlantic Flight. The university expeditions to Spitsbergen led by George Binney in the 1920s and Sandy Glen in the 1930s traversed and surveyed unexplored ground and contributed to developments in polar flight and radar. Other pre-war exploits of these adventurers included a voyage around the world the wrong way, and participation in the British Graham Land Antarctic expedition. Peter Fleming, brother to the creator of James Bond - Ian Fleming - spent the 1930s exploring Brazil, China and Tartary.

The character, skills and endurance obtained in these years set these adventurers and explorers apart as men who were to play a distinguished and heroic role in the Second World War. Their war service took them from the fjords of Norway and Spitsbergen to the jungles of Burma and Malaya and the beaches of Normandy and Italy. They were involved in blockade running, covert operations in Yugoslavia, Corsica and France and took part in major initiatives such as Ian Fleming's Intelligence gathering force, No 30 Assault unit, and the raid on St Nazaire. Most of these men had known each other before war came in 1939. In some cases they ended up serving alongside one another in wartime. The intertwined stories of these characters in peace and war are examples of how the spirit of adventure shown by men in the interwar years contributed to Britain's outstanding role in the Second World War.

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The Whole Armour of God The Whole Armour of God

The Whole Armour of God examines and reassesses the role of the Anglican army chaplains in the Great War. The tensions and ambiguities of their role in the trenches resulted in criticism of their achievements. As with other groups such as army generals, the chaplains were given a bad press in the general disenchantment and iconoclasm of the 1920's and 30's. This book seeks to readdress the balance by using the words and actions of the chaplains themselves, interwoven into the events of the war, to show that many strove valiantly to bring the reality of God to the troops in the maelstrom of war. It explains how they overturned orders and won the right to be with the troops in the front line. It tries to judge the chaplains by the ideas and standards of the time. In February 1919 the Army Chaplains Department was awarded the accolade of being made the Royal Army Chaplains Department in recognition of its work in the war. There is compelling evidence that subsequently the Chaplains have been judged too harshly. The Whole Armour of God argues that the Anglican Chaplains should be given their rightful place in the history of the Great War.

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Contributions

Gallipoli Gallipoli

View on Amazon My chapter in this is called "Each Read Each Others Souls- British and Anzac Chaplains at Gallipoli "

War and Geography War and Geography

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My chapter in this is called "From Ice Stations to Action Stations –– The importance of the Svalbard Archipelago in the Second World War".

Operation Market Garden Operation Market Garden

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My chapter in this is called "The Defence of the Most High: The role of Chaplains in the Battle of Arnhem"

War and Memorials War and Memorials

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My chapter in this is called "A Living Memorial – The Toc H Movement and Talbot House as ‘Living Memorials’"

The Clergy in Khaki The Clergy in Khaki

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My chapter in this is called "'Shell Shocked Prophets' :Anglican Army Chaplains and Post War Reform"